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Coronavirus infection can cause paralysis in children in very rare cases, research study finds

The novel coronavirus infection can cause paralysis in children in very rare cases, a new study reveals.

The University of Manchester looked at neurological symptoms in 38 unusual cases of Covid-19 in under-18s admitted to hospital across eight countries.

The cases were found after a global call for unusual Covid cases in children was put out by the American Society of Pediatric Neuroradiology.




Thirteen came from France, eight from the UK, five from the US, four from Brazil, four from Argentina, two from India, one from Peru and one from Saudi Arabia.

All had MRI scans after developing symptoms of some form, ranging from a standard fever to problems moving their extremities and impaired cognitive function.

Eight of the children had no respiratory symptoms such as shortness of breath or a cough, as is typically associated with Covid-19.



Four children in the study died after contracting another infection, such as TB and MRSA, after Covid-19 had made them more susceptible.

And two of the youngsters in the study were left paralysed after the virus reached their spinal cords and caused inflammation.

One of the children became quadriplegic and was reliant on a ventilator for breathing via a tracheostomy. The child is also being fed with a gastrostomy tube into their stomach.

The second child is also ventilator dependant with a tracheostomy as they are unable to breathe for themselves and had a tube into their stomach to feed them.

They are have dysautonomia, a condition which has left them unable to regulate their heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, bladder function and temperature, for example.

Twenty-six of the children made a full recovery and six were improving when the study was published in the journal The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

SARS-CoV-2 has previously been found to cause neurological issues in adult patients, with delirium and strokes among the reported problems.