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Canon sued for $5 million for disabling scan, fax feature when printers run out of ink

Canon USA is being sued for not allowing owners of certain printers to use the scanner or faxing functions if they run out of ink.

David Leacraft, a customer of Canon, filed the class action lawsuit on Tuesday alleging deceptive marketing and unjust enrichment by the printer manufacturer.

While using his Pixma MG6320 printer from Canon, the plaintiff was surprised to discover that the “all-in-one” machine would refuse to scan or fax documents if the printer ran out of ink.




As ink is not necessary to perform scans or faxes, the argument is that the printer features should continue to work even if there is no ink in the device.

“Plaintiff Leacraft would not have purchased the device or would not have paid as much for it had he known that he would have to maintain ink in the device in order to scan documents,” reads the complaint for the class action lawsuit.

Since at least 2016, other customers have contacted Canon about this exact problem and were told by y support agents that ink cartridges must be installed and contain ink to use the printer’s features.



The complaint further illustrates with images of a Pixma MG2522 box that Canon advertises its All-in-One printers as including three distinct features – print, copying, and scanning.

However, there is no warning to show that ink is required for all of these features.

The class action lawsuit states that consumers had been deceived into buying a product that was designed to artificially and unethically introduce functional bottlenecks by tying them to ink levels, even if there’s no practical link between them.

According to the lawsuit, Canon is only doing this to increase its profits by selling replacement ink cartridges, hence the accusations for unjust enrichment.

The lawsuit was filed in the District Court for the Eastern District of New York and seeks at least $5,000,000 in awards, exclusive of interest, fees, and litigation costs.